Tag Archives: Gene Roddenberry

Spock on CUE Magazine, Dec 7, 1979

As I was sorting through some stuff in my basement, I came across this beautiful, flat cover from CUE magazine, dated Dec 7 1979. New York CUE was a weekly city entertainment guide. (You know, the analog age!) As its focus was the latest in city culture and big time movie and TV releases, it makes perfect sense that our dear Mr. Spock was on the cover! Star Trek: The Motion Picture was just about to be released and the anticipation was high!

I guess I must have bought the magazine solely for the beautiful publicity shot of Leonard Nimoy and his melting brown eyes. “Spock Has the Right Stuff” indeed. Alas, I did NOT keep the rest of the magazine! I was happy to find this cover in beautiful condition though.

My Cover (only) of the CUE magazine

Eager to read the contents of the article, I scrubbed the ‘net for a copy of the article, and fortunately, found these images on eBay. (If you’d like to bid on/buy the whole magazine, here’s the link.)

Excellent article “Star Trekking to Hollywood” by Michael Musto. It includes quotes from Nimoy, Shatner, and Roddenberry, and Robert Wise credits his wife with saying “With no Spock, there can be no Star Trek!”

She was right at the time, of course. But I bet they never realized that this movie would launch a fleet of even newer voyages in Roddenberry’s Universe. Although at the time I was not too thrilled with the final product, in these 41 years since (!) I have found the story of ST:TMP as true to the original source material as it could have been: To explore strange new worlds , one often ends up discovering Themselves. I’m very thankful that ST:TMP was made, it gave Trek to a new generation, and marked it in the foundation of American Pop Culture.

If you’ve never seen it, I highly recommend it! (just fast-forward through the overly long close ups of the Enterprise). The only thing I couldn’t get past were the jumbo onesies on the crew; so glad it was changed to something more sophisticated and flattering in Star Trek II!

There’s a bonus side bar by Daphne Davis about the other blockbuster hitting the screens that year too – The Black Hole.

My Weekly Spock: Veteran Trekkers

As yesterday was Veteran’s Day (and today it was observed), it’s a good time to remember our Star Trek friends who served their country.¬† For Leonard, Gene, and DeForest, it was the United States. And for James Doohan, it was for Canada.

James was also a hero of D-Day, after killing two German snipers,  having been shot at 6 times; 4 in the leg, one in   the right hand, which cost him his middle finger, and one in the chest, but his life was saved by the silver cigarette case in his breast pocket, a gift from his brother.  (for once, it was lucky he was a smoker).

Thank you our Star Trek brothers in arms for your dedicated service during WWII and early 50’s. ¬† We are honored and forever thankful. ‚̧

Capt Gene Roddenberry US Army Air Corps (Served 1941-1945)

Lieutenant James Doohan 14th Field Artillery Regiment of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division.

DeForest Kelley, Army Air Forces-WW2-First Motion Picture Unit 1943-46

Sergeant Leonard Nimoy, Army Reserves 1950s

Happy 50th Star Trek! (My Tribute Poster!)

Sorry this is a day late, but it is no less sincere!¬† It took longer than I imagined, ¬† probably from colorizing the uniforms!) ¬† For this celebration, everyone’s a captain! And special halos for our beloveds watching from above ‚̧

What a dull world it would have been without Star Trek.¬† Aren’t we lucky? Thanks to all who made and make this dream come true, and may the message of Trek’s human harmony Live Long and Prosper!¬† Love, Therese xo50

 

My Weekly Spock – Nimoy in The Lieutenant Part II

Hey All!

Here’s what I suspect a couple of my fangirls here were waiting for since last week (you know who you are!) Here’s Leonard at his finest in the rest of my stills from The Lieutenant episode In the Highest Tradition

He was quite a firecracker here, and Nimoy and Barrett played so well off of each other that their characters of the intense director (Gregg) and¬† his assistant (Ruth) would have made a great spin-off.¬† I can see it now:¬† The Director, starring Leonard Nimoy and Majel¬† Barrett!¬† With lots of sexual tension¬† and plenty of anguished moments where Gregg strips his shirt off…¬† Truly a missed opportunity!

You can see the whole episode here.

 

 

My Weekly Spock — Nimoy in ‘The Lieutenant’ (Pt. I)

Hey Kids,

Here’s your weekly fix; some screencaps of Leonard in “The Lieutenant”, a military series by Gene Roddenberry in 1964.¬† This episode, In the Highest Tradition, was a stepping stone for Nimoy’s casting in Star Trek.

Nimoy plays an hyper A-Personality director who’s hot to make an action war picture based on the exploits of one of the commanders of the title character.¬† Sounds great but the commander has a secret shame…

More pics next week, (you won’t want to miss those)¬† and yes, that IS Majel Barret (Nurse Chapel) as Nimoy’s secretary!

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The Daily Scrapbook: 8/23/13 (1977) — Roddenberry Projects

Here’s today’s flashback:¬† New Roddenberry Projects from Media Spotlight Magazine.¬† Gene discusses his latest projects and (at this point in 1977) the speculation and early pre-production regarding a possible Star Trek film.¬† It notes that the first outlines¬† which were written by such sci-fi notables¬† as Robert Silverberg, Harlan Ellison, Theodore Sturgeon, Dick Simmons and Chris Knopf were rejected by Paramount, just as they had rejected Gene’s original outline.¬† I think this initial action is what caused the first movie to be less Star Trek and more Hollywood.¬† Paramount dropped the ball here, rejecting the Trek creator and others who knew Trek well.¬† I can only imagine that a script from one of these authors, and direction by Philip Kaufman (Invasion of the Body Snatchers) might have been more true to the spirit of the original.¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† And being¬† Media Spotlight,¬† the article¬† naturally features artwork and photos of the original series that have nothing to do with the article’s content!¬† (Ah, they were such a fanzine!)

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The Daily Scrapbook 8/21/13 “Inside Science Fiction”

Hey, this is my 500th post!

Here’s today’s flashback;¬† Another installment of Media Spotlight.¬† This time it’s “Inside Science Fiction” by¬† Jackie Lichtenberg, where she reviews the latest sci-fi related projects by our favorite Trek stars.¬† Especially noteworthy is the LP album¬†Inside Star Trek, which I remember buying at the time for¬† @ $8.00, a big chunk out of my budget for the time.¬† It featured Gene Roddenberry chatting with De Kelley, Bill Shatner and most notably Mark Lenard as Sarek, discussing the fascinating ordeal of¬† Spock’s birth.¬† I still have that LP somewhere, although nowhere to play it!¬† The article also mentions that fans should get a hold of Leonard Nimoy’s recordings of The Martian Chronicles, although they might be a bit too expensive for your average geek’s wallet.¬† The author extols Nimoy on his “rich, velvet voice”.¬† There’s also interesting insights on how “The City on the Edge of Forever might have been if writer Harlan Ellison had his way (a footnote of Star Trek production legend is about how much Ellison hated the way his original script was edited into the legendary episode that aired.¬† (To his credit, Ellison won a Writer’s Guild of America’s Award for his original teleplay).

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The Daily Scrapbook: 7/9/13 (November 1979) NYT Interview w/Roddenberry

Here’s today’s flashback: From November 23rd, 1979, Gene Roddenberry recalls to¬†The New York Times the long, hard trek it took to get Star Trek to the silver screen:

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The Daily Scrapbook 5/21/13 (Summer 1979) A Paramount Pictures Newsletter

Here’s today’s flashback:¬† I had forgotten about this — An actual newsletter from Paramount Pictures promoting Star Trek: The Motion Picture.¬† With an interview with Gene Roddenberry,¬† color photos and lots of hype, it is especially excited about Persis Khambatta, “the olive-skinned beauty” from India with “a clear shot at big-time stardom”.¬†¬† Unfortunately it didn’t quite work out for Persis like that; she made a few forgettable films, was passed over for the (very bland) Maude Adams in Octopussy,¬† and sadly died of a heart attack much too young at 49 in 1996. Hollywood (until recently) often snubs many fine actors associated with Star Trek and Persis was yet another casualty. A¬† great shame too, she could have been the Angelina Jolie of the ’80’s.

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Note Nimoy’s backward picture, probably to balance out the format of the page.

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The Daily Scrapbook: 5/14/13 (8/1979) Progress Report: Star Trek: The Motion Picture

Here’s today’s flashback:¬† From Starlog Magazine, August 1979 – the latest progress report on Star Trek: The Motion Picture.¬† We discover here that Trek had now doubled its original budget of 15 million; mainly because special effects alone were costing 16 million, and that it was Robert Wise who was partially responsible for the look of the horrible bland polyester uniforms in the film, mainly because, as Roddenberry mentions : “…Wise kept to the idea that the uniforms should be utilitarian”¬† Yuck!¬†¬† And for heaven’s sake, I hated that De Kelley had to wear such revealing mommy stretch pants in his first scene (with the beard).¬† Thank goodness the tunics covered the uniform hip-areas!¬† (By the way, this is the last article from my second Star Trek scrapbook! Volume III starts tomorrow!)

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